TheBLAST Podcast

044.2 – Make Small Churches Great Again [PART 2]

May 27, 2019 Season 5 Episode 9
TheBLAST Podcast
044.2 – Make Small Churches Great Again [PART 2]
Chapters
00:00:02
Previously Heard on TheBLAST Podcast
00:01:41
Is it possible to have a healthy small church?
00:04:50
Are you covering for lazy pastors?
00:07:43
How can pastors quit burning out?
00:12:18
Jesus, why did you leave now?
00:13:43
What is the value of longevity in ministry?
00:17:08
How can we make small churches great again?
00:20:24
Musical Interlude - Haven't Seen It Yet by Danny Gokey
00:23:42
Fake News from the Babylon Bee
00:25:49
Post-interview Discussion
00:34:35
A Memorial Day Message from Pastor Adam
TheBLAST Podcast
044.2 – Make Small Churches Great Again [PART 2]
May 27, 2019 Season 5 Episode 9
TheBLAST Podcast / Pastor Karl Vaters
In this episode, we are continuing our interview with Pastor Karl Vaters.
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

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Show Notes for Episode 44.2

In this episode, we are continuing our interview with Pastor Karl Vaters. Please make sure that you have already listened to the first half of the conversation.

Pastor Karl Vaters is the author of The Grasshopper Myth and Small Church Essentials, as well as a regular blogger at ChristianityToday.com. He has 28 years of pastoral experience as a small church pastor in Southern California and has a fantastic ministry of encouraging small church pastors to make the small church great again!

We mentioned Karl's helpful article: It’s Time for Small Churches to Become Great Churches

Thanks again for listening! 

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Speaker 1:
0:00
Previously heard on the blast podcasts, you don't see a grasshopper in your mirror. No one else will see a grasshopper in you. But if you perceive yourself as a grasshopper, then the giants in the land will feel intimidating to you and you will look like that to them, not because they see that in you, but because you seen that in yourself first. And if you start feeling like the grasshopper, you start acting like a grasshopper.:
Speaker 2:
0:26
On this episode of the blast podcast passer Adam dragons and Mr. David smell are blasting across the interwebs. Digging deeper into the practical application of God's word for our lives. Snowflakes fee where we're blasting off on this edition of the last podcast.:
Speaker 3:
0:44
And we welcome you back to the last podcast. This is episode 44, part two of episode 44. We're, um, we're listening to an interview with pastor Karl Vaters. We want to continue. He's, I'm pastor of a small church out in Orange County, California. And um, and uh, it's just very insightful what he's said thus far. And so I really want to get back into it and I want to hear the answer to the question you alluded to last week cause I had the very same thought. Well wait a minute, is this possibly just making an excuse for us remaining small.:
Speaker 4:
1:18
Yeah. And we do want to encourage you, if you haven't heard the first part, please go back, uh, before you listen to this episode and listen to part one. Uh, because, uh, it's going to feed into what we're going to talk about today. And so we're going to, uh, we're going to go ahead and play the second part of this interview and we will discuss, uh, as soon as it's over.:
Speaker 5:
1:39
What's your, what's your view on pastors who, um, when, when we see ourselves as a, that every small church is an unhealthy church. Uh, you know, sometimes we get into this Rut of the church is small, therefore it means it's unhealthy or the church is not growing. It's come to some plateau and that means that something's wrong. Something's wrong with either the people or something's wrong with the pastor. And, um, uh, our tendency is when you start bumping up against that is, okay, well I'm, I guess I'm, it's not working here so I'm going to find another place to go as a pastor or, or even members in the church have that go through their minds as well. But is it possible to have a church that is stable, uh, as far as membership or you know, a small church and still have a healthy church?:
Speaker 1:
2:33
Yeah. Oh yeah. Not only is it possible, but it's happening all over the world. Um, you know, starting with the church that I've been blessed to serve for the last 26 years, we had some unhealthy times. I came to a church that was sick, was broken, was almost dangerous to body and soul and the Lord really helped us or it took us a long time. It took us maybe a dozen years before we could look around and go, not only are we healthy, but in fact we are really moving forward and we'll making impacts here. And, and that was actually about the season where my frustration began because it was like, wow, if we're having this impact but we're not growing, then maybe we're not having the impact I thought we were having, right? We, because we see it so much through the new Miracle Lens, but what we need to do is you can find tons of blog posts out there to say all the signs of a healthy church.:
Speaker 1:
3:20
But what they almost always do is they start by assessing large churches. They look at fast growing churches or big churches, and we go, what made them grow fast? Or what made them big? And then we find this list of healthy things. And then because we started with a list of big or fast growing churches, we make the assumption that these things inevitably lead to fast growth or too big size. But in fact, if you take that list just, and you were then to not, don't start with big churches, fast growing churches, but start with the healthy church list that they're looking forward rather than backward. That they are, that they have a cooperative spirit about them, that they're reaching out to the people in the community and not just taking care of the people that are inside, but are also taking care of the people who were inside that, that, that there's, there's a, there's a, an exciting youthfulness to it, but there's also a respect for the elders in the church and take all of those healthy things.:
Speaker 1:
4:15
And then with that list, look around and find healthy churches that match most or all of that list. And what you'll find is you're going to find a whole bunch of small churches that do match that healthy church list. But we don't do it because we start with the big fast growing one and then we're backwards to the list. We need to start with the list and then look for churches of any size that happened to fulfill all our most of those things. And what you'll find is a whole bunch of small churches that are in fact doing that already.:
Speaker 5:
4:43
Yeah, yeah, yeah. All right. So what do you say to someone who would hear this, this truth? And, and, and say, well, maybe, maybe this is just a way of covering up someone's a lack of real ministry or are you just trying to cover up, um, pastors who are unsuccessful and make them feel better while you know, the church could be doing better? What do you say to that person?:
Speaker 1:
5:12
Great question. That I've been waiting for somebody to ask me in podcast after podcast and somebody finally asked me. That's a great question. Um, yeah, I, I think, I think there is a concern, one of my concerns is that what I'm stating is going to be used as an excuse for lazy pastors to say Lazy. Well, let's just put it, put it straight on the nose. Yes, that's a concern of mine. But it's no more of a concern than if I were church growth pastor. That I would be concerned that people just drive for numbers at the sake of depth. You, you got in one in one direction, you got that danger in this direction. You've got, you've got another danger. So yes, that's a concern. Uh, but I have not found it to be the case. I've been this now for six years. I've talked to, you know, I've spoken at hundreds of conferences, I've spoken to tens of thousands of passengers this point.:
Speaker 1:
6:05
And through the blog I've probably, well I know cause I've got the numbers. I, it's been, they've been read millions of times and you know, here I am, a small church pastor. Sounds like I'm bragging about the numbers. I'm not, uh, the reason I bring those numbers up is because we now have enough data in, through those numbers to recognize that in fact what you just described as a legitimate concern. In fact, I can't count on one hand situations where that's been the case, uh, that, that that's simply because that's not what I'm presenting. That is typically not how people will take it. And quite frankly, uh, here's, here's the reason why a lazy pastor, a pastor who are looking to settle for less, isn't going to be googling to find the information that we're putting out there. They're not bothering, they're not going to.:
Speaker 1:
6:50
So if, if they're reading what I'm reading, it's because they're looking for help. And if you're looking for help, you're not lazy, you're not settling for less. So it, it has a way of kind of self excluding the lazy pastor or the one who settling for less. They're just not bothering to look for the stuff. So yeah, the concern you expressed is a legitimate concern, but it's simply hasn't been as it played out in the, in the numbers over the last few years, which is a real relief for me because when I started, I did worry that by, if it goes that direction that I'm going to have to reassess this. And thankfully it hasn't gone that way.:
Speaker 5:
7:24
Yeah. Yeah. And I think just the fact of someone sticking to a church, even when you feel like you're not as successful as you could be, that that's a sign of, uh, of commitment to something. Um, so many of the churches and pastors that, that are hearing this podcast are working pastors also. So we're having to, uh, I, speaking from experience, I, I have to keep a job to support my family and then on the side to, uh, to, to, you know, provide, um, uh, spiritual nourishment for our churches. And so we are just, uh, many of us were running haggard, you know, barely hanging on by our teeth with, with our time and our energy. And so, um, what would you say to the pastor who is saying, well, you know, I, if I could just get my church to the next level, then that means I could stop being a volunteer pastor and you know, I can, well, what kind of things can we look forward to, to break through to that next level?:
Speaker 1:
8:30
Yeah. My maybe my, my, one of my favorite verses over the last few years is, um, the only verse in the New Testament where the word pastor is actually used to describe a, a role in the church to Ephesians four verses 11 and 12. As pastor centric. As our churches are, we get one mentioned in the New Testament and we have to share the spotlight in that section with other ministry gifts, right? Apostles, prophets, teachers, evangelists. Um, and those five fold ministry gifts are given one job in that passage. And it's not to do the work of ministry for the church, which is what wears us out. It is to equip God's people to do the work of ministry. Now the challenge for most pastors is at first it's easier to go, oh, I'll just do it myself than it is to train other people to do it. But if we do that, if we follow that, what I like to call it, the pastoral prime mandate because it's the only place where mentioned that it's the only command were given in that mention equip God's people for works of service.:
Speaker 1:
9:32
When we begin to do that, then one, we start taking the load off of our shoulders cause I'll just start picking it up. Um, two, we create much more disciplined and mature disciples because they're actually doing the work of ministry. Three we lower, uh, we lower expectations, quite frankly, for the amount of time that they expect us to, to spend because they look at it and go, no, it's our job to do the ministry gets your job to teach me how to do it. And now that I figured out how or you've helped me to do it, I'm going to step up and do it. And then the amazing thing is when people do ministry, they tend to support it more including financially. So if you've got a church of 50 and you're doing all the ministry for them, you will burn out. Yeah. But if you're leading a church of 50 and you can disciple even 10 of them to start stepping up and doing the work of ministry and taking it over when you can't be there, that will lighten your load 10 fold because now you've got others who are there taking this off your shoulder that off your shoulder.:
Speaker 1:
10:35
Another thing I for shoulder, you'll be able to actually have sabbath once a week. You'll be able to take a vacation where you're not worried and texting every single day, especially on Sunday to make sure things are going right now. It takes some work to get there. Like I said, when you first start doing it, it's really tempting to go, oh, it's just easier to do it myself. But if we can do that, and it's not an I, it's not a weird, clever new idea from me. It is Ephesians four, 11 and 12, it's, it's Paul's instructions to what to pastors are and how we're supposed to behave. If we can equip God's people to do work in ministry, we, we use our own burden. We make the church and much more likely to sustain, sustain itself. And we even increased the likelihood of the financial base, which then is a higher likelihood of allowing us to maybe work less outside the church and more inside the church. Uh, to me, it all, it all comes back there, uh, a church of any size that's supposed to be the pastor job. But the smaller the church, I think the more important it is.:
Speaker 5:
11:35
Yeah. I hear you describing the principle of discipleship, which is what Paul was telling Timothy to train others in same way of training. Do you train others who can then go and train and even more for four generations of discipleship that are in there. And that's what Jesus did with his, his, he didn't, he didn't go. And uh, and obviously he did take time to minister to the masses when he fed the 5,000 and so forth. But he really focused his ministry and on these 12 and a and train them to do, he was doing. And so yeah, we can definitely learn from that no matter what size.:
Speaker 1:
12:16
I think it was Philip Yancey in his book, the Jesus, I never knew who said the hardest. Well, the thing he has the hardest time with out of everything Jesus did on earth, the thing he has the hardest time with is that he left. Yeah. Like is teaching, no problem. His miracles, no problem. But he left before the thing is really gotten going in a resurrected, now's the time to hit the ground running and you're just go peace out. I'm done. And you and you hand it off to these, these crazy people. He says, that's all we, every time I read the gospels, that was the hardest thing. Why did you leave now? And the point I think he makes in there is what we were just talking about, which is no, he'd equip them. They were ready. And quite frankly, if he'd stayed, they would continue to just let him do everything. That's the thing I've discovered as a pastor too. If you do all the ministry for the church, they'll let you, yeah. Right? Yup. So you really have to create this vacuum. You disciple them, you do what Jesus did. You get them ready and then before it feels like they're really ready to step up, get out of the room and let them do it. Let them take it on their shoulders and you'll be surprised at how much people can actually step up.:
Speaker 5:
13:26
Yeah, absolutely. Um, I'd like to ask you just a couple more questions. Um, and I heard you mentioned that you had been in your current ministry position for 20, 26 years. So, um, can you talk about the value of longevity in ministry? Um, I see, um, something that happens in our organization is when pastors get frustrated, there's a quick response to just jump to the next opportunity within, you know, four or five years or to say, well, it's just not working here or there, maybe there's something wrong with me or something wrong with my city. Um, and, and let me see if I can find another place where if I can be a missionary or if I can turn into an evangelist or do something else. Can, can you, um, can you tell us more about what the value is of longterm ministry?:
Speaker 1:
14:17
Yeah, hi. You add the value of it simply cannot be overstated. As someone who is at 26 years now, uh, I thought seven, eight, nine years ago at least, that I'd finally hit the last stage. And there's no more kind of new stages to come. But there are, um, and the biggest challenge and what you've just stated is, yeah, there you are going to hit these moments where you're gonna hit a wall and you're going to go, okay, if I just done everything I can do here, do I need to go elsewhere? And in most cases, what we need to do is something that I call transition without relocation. What we think is I need to transition, and in our head that means relocate, go to another church. Yeah. If you do that, what you do is you end up recycling the same thing over and over again and you end up doing the same four or five, six, seven, whatever it is, years of ministry and you never grow. But when you hit that wall, the most likely thing that God wants you to do is he wants you to grow. He wants you to transition into the next phase of your ministry. In the place that you're at right now.:
Speaker 1:
15:19
As an example, I have, I have significantly changed the way I preach five times in the 26 years that I've been here. Because there were moments where I looked at it and said, okay, uh, the church around me has changed, or the culture around me has changed, or I've changed enough that this is time to do something in a new way. So I'm gonna change it up. I'm going to learn a, I'm going to make that change. I'm going to make those adaptations. Unfortunately, when most of us do is we arrive at a place of doing ministry, we become comfortable with it and then we just stay there and we can only go so far. We can only help a church go so far if we're not constantly changing and growing and learning and adapting ourselves. And that's not, you know, I know there are some people who immediately when they hear that they think, oh, it's a slippery slope towards, you know, compromising scripture.:
Speaker 1:
16:10
No, it's not at all. It's simply growing as a human being. It's allowing the Holy Spirit to continue to transform me and my heart and my mind and my ministry. So let them getting better at it. And usually that happens in incremental steps, but every once in a while that will happen in a big leap. And when we hit those big leap, you can call it a wall or you can call it a chasm. Either way, when we hit those spots, that temptation is to cut and run and go to another church where we can repeat the same cycle. But let me encourage every single pastor out there. Yes, there are times when it may be time for you to relocate, but I think far more often we're relocating when we should be transitioning and staying at the same place and bringing ourselves on the church to a new level.:
Speaker 5:
16:54
I think that is so great. And, um, to, to close this thing out, I was just scrolling through some of your blog posts, um, recently or in the one that, uh, that caught my attention is it is time for small churches to become great churches. And, uh, I think that resonates so well with, uh, with people who are going to hear this podcast is that a yes, we would love to see our ministries thrive and we would love to see our buildings packed out. But I think even more what brings greater glory to God is when we will see the people that we already have. And we would minister to those people, not to the people who aren't coming to the ones who are coming. And we would bring in them and train them. And, and that even our church, uh, as it is now can be better than it is at this moment. So, um, could, could you encourage small churches to become great churches?:
Speaker 1:
17:48
Yeah, absolutely. We, every once in a while somebody will ask me and say, you know, why? Why do you want churches to be small? And my answer is always the same. I don't want churches to be small. I want small churches to be great. Yeah. You don't have to want small churches, churches to be small, wanting churches to be small as like wanting Hawaii to be sunny. You don't have to want it. It's just, it's natural state. So do I want small churches know Aye I Aye. Y'All don't have to want them. There was just tons of small ones all over the place. I want small churches to be great and I have learned in the past few years that they can be great. And I am continuing to learn how that happens. And every time I learn a new thing, I try to put it out somewhere so that other small church pastors like myself can continue to be encouraged, can continue to connect with each other so we can learn from each other. And then as we find a new way of being a great small church, we can share it with somebody else.:
Speaker 5:
18:40
Thank you so much for your ministry. Uh, Carl, it's been a great talking to you. I wonder if we could just close out with a word of prayer and pray for the, any, anyone who's gonna hear this?:
Speaker 1:
18:49
Absolutely. Absolutely. I'd love to do that more. Thank you so much for the faithful servants who work so hard. Uh, many of them, like my friend Adam here right now who are working at a place outside of the church walls to make ends meet, to bring in the finances for the family and then who get home and who work on the weekend to to build your body about Lord or whatever our circumstance would ever our size of church, I pray first of all, for the discouraged pastor that you would help them to find the encouragement that they need to let them know that they're not a failure because the church might not be as big as somebody says it ought to be, but they are right where you want them to be. Secondly, Lord, help them to maybe find a friend or so many churches where the pastors are working in isolation.:
Speaker 1:
19:35
They don't feel like they have a friend, someone they can reach out with, some of they can share the highs and lows of ministry with. So I pray that you'd bring a relationships their way. And then thirdly, Lord, I pray that you would bring an even greater renewed sense of mission and vision and excitement and passion to their heart, into their churches. May the churches that are represented listening to this, uh, to my voice right now, even if they never become bigger, that they will become healthier and that they would have a greater impact than ever before. In your name we pray. Amen.:
Speaker 5:
20:09
Oh Man. Thank you so much, um, pastor graders into been an honor to talk to you. I, I appreciate all of your ministry and your books and your writing,:
Speaker 6:
20:16
so keep it up. You're helping a lot of meme. Thanks Adam. I appreciate it. Have you been praying? Can you just to have no answer.:
Speaker 6:
20:28
Have you been Paulina out your hub for so many? Have you been home changed? Have you cried all the faith you have to, so manatee, don't forget the every man, it's like the weight on the other side. The dark is, hold on and maybe you just haven't just [inaudible] found the break of dog. Oh, just that. [inaudible] sure. For you add the proper CCS, the best show first, that question [inaudible]. It's like the dark, just [inaudible], just [inaudible]. It is moving with a love. So deep [inaudible] neighbor where we can see, we can see, but we believe that hate this [inaudible] the common name and where we can see, we can see it's like the pride. Okay.:
Speaker 7:
23:40
This week from the Babylon bee police detained local father on suspicion of really puns. May 16th, 2019 Rye New York, Bob Larson's neighbors claim he was always friendly and ordinary father with a beautiful family and a well kept home in an affluent neighborhood. But underneath the surface, evil was lurking as Mr. Larson was just detained by the family unit of the local police department on suspicion of constantly subjecting his wife and children to quote unquote really bad puns and anonymous source informed authorities that Mr. Larson was working in abusive pun into quote just about every conversation on quote with his family prompting the investigation and subsequent detainment when an investigator arrived at the home, Mr. Larson offered him a water too, which detective nodded and said, sure, I'm thirsty. Larson. And immediately responded by saying, hi, thirsty. I'm Bob prompting the official to immediately place him under arrest for the safety of the family.:
Speaker 7:
24:48
We have substantial evidence that Mr. Larson was engaging in puns, plays on words and corny jokes that would make any reasonable person cringe. The officer assigned to the case told reporters the jokes Mr. Larson told would make your skin crawl stuff like, do you know why I like camping because it's intense. And there was a guy whose whole left side was cut off, but he's all right now are just the tip of the iceberg in this case. It's a real doozy. He added with a sigh when Larson was checked into a temporary detention facility. He was reportedly asked if he wanted to get his haircut, to which he replied, no, I want to get them all.:
Speaker 6:
25:30
[inaudible]:
Speaker 2:
25:41
welcome back to the blast podcasts. We're wearing tighter pants and leaning on a stool does not qualify you for ministry.:
Speaker 4:
25:50
Well, and we are back. Uh, well. That is some good stuff, Dave. Oh my goodness. I feel encouraged just by listening to it again. Yeah. I really liked his answer. To your question about, uh, you know, is this just an excuse for laziness? I love that he pointed out that a lazy person would not seek out is exactly, wouldn't even care. Yeah. You wouldn't even seek out his writing because they're lazy. Yeah. I think that so many pastors are, you know, you just frustrated. You know, I've just feeling frustrated and, and um, and but that doesn't, that doesn't really help. Just the sense of frustration and that's why we turn to, uh, sources of inspiration hopefully and, and try to find, seek out help in some way. And thank God that we hear in our fellowship, we have pastors, we have, um, fellow workers that we can turn to for encouragement.:
Speaker 4:
26:41
But, um, I love his on the small church and making small churches great again and, and uh, I love that, uh, that he's such an encouragement, uh, just even to me personally, so I know that somebody who has heard this, uh, we'll also be encouraged and I do want to really encourage you to take the next step. We're going to provide links to pastor Vader's, a book, the grasshopper myth, and also his blog on Christianity today. Please check those links. He is releasing articles, uh, several times per week, two or three times per wheel. Uh, very, very, uh, helpful, um, and each week that, that, uh, that he is helping people just like me and just like you. And so please check those notes and we want to hear your feedback also. Uh, what did you hear that really encouraged you? And, um, something that has even spoken to me over the last few months is that idea of longevity that we talked about toward the end and, um, because how quick are we, you know, sometimes I've seen churches go through three or four pastors in a five year span, you know, I've sure, and some of it, you know, there's, uh, there's tragedies that are involved,:
Speaker 3:
27:56
right? There's extenuating circumstances. Sometimes, sometimes there's a failure or you know, some kind of like a moral failure or something and those things do happen. Yeah. Right? Um, but, uh, I've, uh, one of the things I've, I've seen even in our organization is oh well, uh, that guy couldn't really get anything going after two years. And so we pulled him back for redirection and I'm going was that long enough? May maybe just give them a little more time, you know, but I don't have the wisdom that, uh, you know, that, that the leaders, we're not here to have, I'm not here to bash them or anything, but yeah. You know, just kind of makes you wonder like, well, maybe there was something else going on, but, uh, but it is also encouraging, cause I know there's, there's people like a Paul Stephens, um, he for I think it was 18 years, pastored a church of less than 30 people.:
Speaker 3:
28:49
Yup. Free. I mean, and so I remember hearing pastor Campbell say that one time and he said, when I say this, you're all out there going, no, no, no, I'm plugging my ears. I don't ever want to hear that ever again, pastor, less than 30 people for 18 years. And he said, well, the thing is, God saw that. And, and now, uh, today he's stepped into a, a completely different ministry where, where he's a pastoring a large church today. So, but we get all jacked up about the numbers. The other thing is, um, fruitfulness. Sometimes we see, you know, we'll didn't Jesus tell us to that we would, we need to bear much fruit. So what does that look like? It means our tree, uh, it needs to put out more apples. You know what I'm saying? Right. It needs to get taller and wider and bigger and put out more apples. And so that, uh, you know, practically translates into us getting a bigger building and in more seats and more people in the seats. Isn't that what that means? Well, not really because, because doesn't that also mean that we're supposed to be, uh, it Japal tree doesn't necessarily have to become 5,000 feet tall and put out zillions of apples a year. It could be that it drops apples. Those seeds get planted and more trees grow. Yeah. Yup. So:
Speaker 4:
30:12
that's very true. And, uh, we shouldn't, we shouldn't be comparing ourselves. You know, we, we, we need to seek the will of God for our own lives and for our own situations. And if we've done that, then I think that we can define success in the correct way. Sometimes success simply means continuing to obey God no matter what, how, what size your church, if you are obedient God, then you are successful. And I think that we need to be reminded of that from time to time, especially in a, in small churches and small churches don't always stay small churches, churches, either they don't have to. The the, the truth that I love from pastor Vader's as he, he emphasizes not about the size of the church but about the health of the church. And it is possible. It is wonderful to have a church of 50 people and still be very, very healthy. A church that gives a church that outreaches a church that's not centered on itself, a church that is la family. All of those things that he spoke about, those signs of healthiness. Yeah. And you can have a healthy small church.:
Speaker 3:
31:17
So glad he said the thing about, you know, when, when you, uh, put that, those expectations on other people where you're not doing everything where the pastor is not doing everything and he allows disciples to do it, they, um, you know, first of all, you'll be surprised to see what they'll do, but also their investment of time, it'll end up playing out in like financial investor investment as well. That's right. You know, uh, one of the things that people say sometimes, and this is a, I found this to be an untruth is, well, I just give of my time. Well, look, if you actually just give of your time, you're gonna end up giving of your finance resources, you're going to end up not only making a time investment, you're going to end up making a, you're going to end up putting all of yourself into whatever it is you're doing. You know? So the people who tend to say, well, you know, I just, I, I give in other ways I give of my time. No, you probably don't get that either.:
Speaker 4:
32:23
Yeah. That's awesome. Well, uh, we're going to go ahead and wrap up, uh, the second part of episode 44 and we're glad that you've been here to listen to it. We'd love to hear your feedback. Uh, if you've been encouraged by this, please reach out to us and let us know. Also, you can, uh, reach out what we'll put links for pastor and how you can, um, uh, share your, your encouragement with him as well. Uh, he has been so gracious to allow us to, uh, interview him and put this on our podcast. So please reach out and let him know that you appreciate it. So with that, we're going to go ahead and, uh, close out in prayer. Amen. Father, we come by the blood of Jesus and we thank you for your spirit. We thank you that you have allowed your people got to come together and hear this message of encouragement.:
Speaker 4:
33:07
I pray for every pastor and every disciple and especially for those who are struggling with this, of feeling adequate in their small church and comparing themselves, um, to other ministries. Lord. I'm just praying that you encourage and help us to be reminded that as long as we are obedient, as long as we are in your will than we are successful and we'll leave the numbers to you. God will leave the souls saved. We'll leave the gold sheets. We'll leave that in your hands as long as we are faithful to do what you've called us to do and I pray, God, that you had just a help us wherever we are. Uh, every person who is hearing this podcast, I pray that you would bless them and speak to them, give them revelation and understanding and we thank you for your grace. In Jesus' name we pray. Amen.:
Speaker 8:
33:53
Amen. God bless you. We'll see you next time on the blast podcast. Thanks for listening to the blast podcast. If you like what you heard, please leave us a review on iTunes and share with someone who will love it. If you don't like what you've heard,:
Speaker 2:
34:07
we said anything. Sign up to receive new episodes or listen to previous ones on our website, the blast dot board until next time, live for God. Use your brain. Read Your Bible, Love Your family, listen to your pastor. Hey, you're tied at, don't be stupid.:
Speaker 9:
34:29
Yeah.:
Speaker 4:
34:33
Hey, this is pastor Adam. Wanted to take a moment to wish, a very happy memorial day to those of you who are listening to it. It's here in 2019 we're marking almost 75 years since the invasion of d day to specially pointed for me because my grandfather was there on that day. He was a truck driver and of his entire platoon, he was one of only three who survived the invasion of Normandy on that d day. And of course, uh, because he did survive, um, I'm able to be here with you. Uh, and so I'm grateful for that, but I'm also cognizant of the fact that there was a whole lot of other men who died that day on that beach, uh, who gave their lives so that we can have freedom that we celebrate today. And I wanted to just take a moment to express my gratitude for all of those who serve, all of those who have given their lives in the line of duty.:
Speaker 4:
35:32
All of those who have laid down their lives, uh, no greater love than this then. Then you would lay down your life for a friend. And I want to thank you, those military active duty who are listening to this and all those who have family members who are serving or who have served. It's an incredible thing that we have in this nation that we honor those who have served. And so, uh, if you're going to the beach today, just remember that 75 years ago there were beaches being stormed and men dying and blood was flowing so that we could have the freedom to do what we do today. And a Happy Memorial Day. Everybody.:
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Post-interview Discussion
A Memorial Day Message from Pastor Adam
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